Siemens Gamesa to Supply Turbines for 301 MW Wind Farm in Karnataka

Highlights :

  • Siemens Gamesa has received a firm order to supply wind turbines for a 301 MW wind farm located in Hombal, Karnataka, India.

  • The order comprises the supply of 87 wind turbines of the SG 3.4-145 model, whose setup is scheduled for March 2023.

Spain-based renewable energy company Siemens Gamesa has been awarded a firm order to supply wind turbines for a wind farm located in Hombal, in the state of Karnataka, India, with a total capacity of 301 MW.

The company has received the project through one of its subsidiaries, and the order comprises the supply of 87 wind turbines of the SG 3.4-145 model, whose setup is scheduled for March 2023. According to the turbine maker’s brief bourse filing, the order was placed by a customer who asked not to be identified.

Siemens Gamesa has made many notable announcements since the beginning of this year, such as securing its largest order to date in Vietnam for a 117 MW wind farm; revealing that it will deliver 79 of its industry-leading Typhoon-class onshore wind turbines for Japan’s largest 339.7 MW wind farm cluster of four wind projects; securing a landmark deal to supply, install and commission 32 onshore turbines for the largest wind farm in the Philippines to date; bagging its largest offshore agreement in Taiwan to date, which now covers the Hai Long 2B (232 MW) and Hai Long 3 (512 MW) projects; etc.

Additionally, Siemens Gamesa and Spanish energy giant Repsol announced have signed their first contract together that will see the installation of 24 SG 5.0-145 wind turbines across four wind farms in Spain, with a total installed capacity of 120 MW.

Recycling wind turbine components has become an important concern of late. At the Spanish Wind Energy Association (AEE)’s Annual Congress, held last month, Giles Dickson, CEO of WindEurope, and Juan Virgilio Márquez, General Director of AEE, called upon the European Commission to propose a Europe-wide ban on landfilling decommissioned wind turbine blades. The ban should enter into force by 2025 and also apply to other large composite components in the nacelles of modern wind turbines. With this call, the European wind industry actively committed to re-using, recycling, or recovering 100% of decommissioned blades.

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Soumya Duggal

Soumya is a master's degree holder in English, with a passion for writing. It's an interest she has directed towards environmental writing recently, with a special emphasis on the progress being made in renewable energy.

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