PolyJoule Promises Plastic Batteries To Store Renewable Energy on Grid

Highlights :

  • PolyJoule says that their batteries are ultra-safe, sustainable, have long life and cost low.
  • PolyJoule batteries use electrodes made of conductive polymers. Simply put, a conductive polymer is an organic-based compound that is not a metal, but can act like one

Battery storage forms a crucial link in the renewable energy system, given the intermittent nature of renewables. Amid many technologies that are emerging in the domain, Boston-based energy start up PolyJoule has created a battery which is made up of plastic – electrically conductive polymers – which makes the energy storage on the grid not just cheaper but also more durable.

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PolyJoule says that its batteries can prove a good alternative to lithium-ion batteries for intermittent renewables like wind and solar. The company has created over 18,000 cells. It says that its batteries are ultra-safe, sustainable, have long life and low cost. The conductive polymers used in the battery have replaced traditionally employed lithium and lead.

“PolyJoule batteries use electrodes made of conductive polymers. Simply put, a conductive polymer is an organic-based compound that is not a metal, but can act like one,” says PolyJoule. Energy storage needs to be affordable both today and tomorrow, it adds.

PolyJoule was founded by Tim Swager and Ian Hunter, Professors at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), who say that their novel battery can hold charge for a long time and gets charged speedily. Power storage is also greater and plastic makes the batteries stronger, which eliminates the challenges of swelling and contraction of the battery during charge and discharge functions.

PolyJoule claims that its batteries can rapidly discharge power, up to 1MW, in less than 10 seconds. Extreme power protects against voltage intermittency in mission-critical applications. It also says that after a discharge, the battery can be recharged quickly in less than 5 minutes, ensuring power and storage available multiple times throughout a day of operation.

PolyJoule says, with their polymer made batteries, there are no cycling per day limitations, no HVAC maintenance costs and it’s easy to site, permit and commission. Also, in contrast to lithium ion batteries, there is no need for any temperature control systems in the PolyJoule system. They do not overheat or catch fire.

Many believe, the inaugural system of PolyJoule might be costly as they presently look for $65 for every kWh of storage and believe that industry and power utilities might be interested in their solution, as it is way below the average cost $135 kWh of Lithium ion batteries in 2021.

PolyJoule says that their energy storage systems are suitable for urban centers, remote outposts and anywhere in between.

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