Google’s Data Centers in Tennessee and Alabama to Run on 1.6 Mn Solar Panels

Located in Hollywood, Alabama and Yum Yum, Tennessee, the two biggest solar farms will be able to produce around 150 megawatts each.

Google 1.6 Mn

In an attempt to match its energy-use with 100 percent carbon-free energy, Google wants the electricity consumed by its new data centers in Tennessee, and Alabama, to be matched with 100 percent renewable energy from the very first day.

And to realize this goal, the global giant announced that it has struck a multi-year deal with the Tennessee Valley Authority to purchase output from several new solar farms, which will total 413 megawatts of power from 1.6 million solar panels – the equivalent of 65,000 home rooftop solar systems.

Located in Hollywood, Alabama and Yum Yum, Tennessee, the two biggest solar farms will be able to produce around 150 megawatts each. These solar sites will be among the largest renewable energy projects in the Tennessee Valley region, and the largest solar farms ever to be built for Google.

“Thanks to the deployment of 1.6 million solar panels, approximately 72 percent of our data center electricity use in Alabama and Tennessee will be matched on an hourly basis with carbon-free sources—compared to a status-quo regional grid mix that is 48 percent carbon-free,” the company said in a statement.

Deploying solar farms will also create economic benefits for Tennessee and northern Alabama. By creating job opportunities, making lease payments the projects will generate millions of dollars in economic activity and tax revenue for the broader community. To date, Google’s more than 30 long-term contract commitments to purchase renewable energy have resulted in nearly $5 billion in investment worldwide.

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Ayush Verma

Ayush Verma

Ayush is a staff writer at saurenergy.com and writes on renewable energy with a special focus on solar and wind. Prior to this, as an engineering graduate trying to find his niche in the energy journalism segment, he worked as a correspondent for iamrenew.com.

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