Canadian Solar Modules Light-up Medical Center in a Country with 5% Electrification

This is how the use of solar can provide greatly needed electricity in a country like Sierra Leone which is having just 1 per cent electrification rate in rural areas.

Canadian Solar

With an aim to support in a social cause for the society, solar PV modules maker Canadian Solar has donated its MaxPower CS6U-P 330W solar modules to power up 4 KW solar system at the Evans Medical Center at Kirma, Lungi, Sierra Leone.

Now, this new solar power system has been successfully energized and started providing electricity to the Medical Center in Sierra Leone, a West African country with only 5 per cent electrification rate.

This is how the use of solar can provide greatly needed electricity in a country like Sierra Leone which is having just 1 per cent electrification rate in rural areas.

This charity project was initiated by Melanie Evans from the ‘Lungi Sierra Leone Charity’ a year ago.

Besides Canadian Solar, four other solar industry partners donated additional equipments for this project such as storage and control systems.

For this project, inverter, charge controller and electrical components were supplied by UK-based Segen’s South African subsidiary SegenSolar (Pty) Ltd.

On the other hand, Schletter Group has provided mounting systems, whereas Bonus Solar has contributed batteries, cables and isolators.

Moreover, the installation and commissioning for the project were carried out by Electric Future, who specializes in the design & delivery of solar installations.

This is an example of how various companies can synthesize their resources in order to secure positive results.

Now, this new power system is providing electricity with a sustainable energy source to the clinic and enabled a constant power supply for its vaccine refrigerators, blood bank and many other medical accessories including emergency lighting.

Commenting on the development, Canadian Solar, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Dr Shawn Qu said, “The realization of the solar power system for the clinic in Lungi shows how our industry can sustainably improve the situation for newborn babies, children, and the local population in a developing country.”

Earlier, this Medical Center had to rely on an ageing generator, which would incur prohibitive costs if it operated for twenty-four hours a day. But now, that generator is used as a backup generator.

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Manu Tayal

Manu Tayal

Manu is an Associate Editor at Saur Energy International where she writes and edits clean & green energy news, featured articles and interview industry veterans with a special focus on solar, wind and financial segments.

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