SoftServe and Lightricity Partner to Innovate Power Harvesting Technology

SoftServe will use power harvesting techniques to develop solutions to make electronic devices more power efficient, prolong their lifetime, and make maintenance easier.

SoftServe and Lightricity Partner

SoftServe, a leading digital authority and consulting company, recently announced its partnership with Lightricity, a leader in photovoltaic energy harvesting technology.

As a partner, SoftServe will use power harvesting techniques to develop solutions to make electronic devices more power efficient, prolong their lifetime, and make maintenance easier.

“There are numerous sources of energy all around us, yet we still commonly use conventional batteries to power devices we use every day,” said Vladyslav Tsybulnyk, R&D principal at SoftServe. “Through our partnership with Lightricity, we are meeting future demands for more innovative approaches to environment-friendly and durable methods to power electronics—such as energy harvesting from indoor light.”

The development of alternative power sources will yield significant advancements in the application of common devices as well as in innovative solutions. For example, consumers could use battery-free devices that are powered from indoor light, prolonging the life of common devices such as watches and mobile phones.  

“Lightricity’s technology is an obvious alternative to using mains power or primary batteries for IoT devices typically operating with AAA or coin cell batteries,” said Mathieu Bellanger, technical director of Lightricity. “Under 1000 lux illumination (a well-lit supermarket for example), only 2 cm2 of Lightricity’s Energy Harvester can produce the equivalent of 30 CR2032 batteries over 10 years product lifetime, which is up to six times more than conventional PV energy harvesting technologies.”

Lightricity’s technology was originally developed from 2012 at SHARP Laboratories in Oxford, UK. Lightricity Ltd. was then founded in 2017 to further develop and enhance its industry-leading energy harvesting technology, building on its 50-year legacy in solar energy.

Recently, we reported that to combat the water salination issue and to make fresh water readily available to the farming sector irrespective of the quality of the local groundwater supply, University of New South Wales’ (UNSW) Global Water Institute (GWI) is developing an innovative, solar-powered version of a desalination technology called Capacitive Deionisation (CDI).

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Ayush Verma

Ayush is a staff writer at saurenergy.com and writes on renewable energy with a special focus on solar and wind. Prior to this, as an engineering graduate trying to find his niche in the energy journalism segment, he worked as a correspondent for iamrenew.com.

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