Researchers Find Ways to Generate Hydrogen Fuel from Sunlight

A new research, led by Govinder Singh Pawar, who is an Indian origin scientist at the University of Exeter in the UK, has given a ray of hope for the solar fuel.

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The total energy produced by sunlight in a single hour is equivalent to the mankind’s total energy consumption for one year, but the development of devices to turn this abundant natural gift into a feasible energy source for mankind had remained a challenge.

A new research, led by Govinder Singh Pawar, who is an Indian origin scientist at the University of Exeter in the UK, has given a ray of hope for the solar fuel.

As per the report, published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team of researchers developed an innovative method to split water into its constituent parts – Hydrogen and Oxygen – using sunlight.

The hydrogen can then be used as a fuel, with the potential to power everyday items such as homes and vehicles.

Hydrogen is considered to be a promising alternative fuel source that is clean — its only by-product is water — and is capable of replacing fossil fuels.

The University said in a statement that, “The Hydrogen fuel that can be created through this synthetic photosynthesis method would not only severely reduce carbon emissions but would also create a virtually limitless energy source.”

“Photo electro-chemical” water splitting, emulating the natural photosynthesis using man-made materials, has long been considered as the Holy Grail to a carbon-free hydrogen economy.

However, efforts to produce efficient stable semiconductor material, in order to effectively convert sunlight to a storable widespread energy source, had so far proved elusive.

The ground-breaking new research by Pawar and co-workers at University’s Environment and Sustainability Institute centres on the use of a revolutionary photo-electrode – made from nanoparticles of the elements lanthanum (La), iron(Fe) and oxygen(O).

The university in its statement said that Pawar and his colleagues “are currently working on further improving our material to make it more efficient to produce Hydrogen”.

Source: IANS

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Manu Tayal

Manu Tayal

Manu is an Associate Editor at Saur Energy International where she writes and edits clean & green energy news, featured articles and interview industry veterans with a special focus on solar, wind and financial segments.

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